reference : Health impact modelling of active travel visions for England and Wales using an integrated transport and health impact modelling tool (ITHIM)

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/reference/06634d89-c838-4a06-ad76-6fca7deef5c0
Bibliographic fields
reftype Journal Article
Abstract Achieving health benefits while reducing greenhouse gas emissions from transport offers a potential policy win-win; the magnitude of potential benefits, however, is likely to vary. This study uses an Integrated Transport and Health Impact Modelling tool (ITHIM) to evaluate the health and environmental impacts of high walking and cycling transport scenarios for English and Welsh urban areas outside London. Methods Three scenarios with increased walking and cycling and lower car use were generated based upon the Visions 2030 Walking and Cycling project. Changes to carbon dioxide emissions were estimated by environmental modelling. Health impact assessment modelling was used to estimate changes in Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) resulting from changes in exposure to air pollution, road traffic injury risk, and physical activity. We compare the findings of the model with results generated using the World Health Organization's Health Economic Assessment of Transport (HEAT) tools. Results This study found considerable reductions in disease burden under all three scenarios, with the largest health benefits attributed to reductions in ischemic heart disease. The pathways that produced the largest benefits were, in order, physical activity, road traffic injuries, and air pollution. The choice of dose response relationship for physical activity had a large impact on the size of the benefits. Modelling the impact on all-cause mortality rather than through individual diseases suggested larger benefits. Using the best available evidence we found fewer road traffic injuries for all scenarios compared with baseline but alternative assumptions suggested potential increases. Conclusions Methods to estimate the health impacts from transport related physical activity and injury risk are in their infancy; this study has demonstrated an integration of transport and health impact modelling approaches. The findings add to the case for a move from car transport to walking and cycling, and have implications for empirical and modelling research.
Author Woodcock, James; Givoni, Moshe; Morgan, Andrei Scott
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0051462
Issue 1
Journal PLOS ONE
Pages e51462
Publisher Public Library of Science
Title Health impact modelling of active travel visions for England and Wales using an integrated transport and health impact modelling tool (ITHIM)
Volume 8
Year 2013
Bibliographic identifiers
_record_number 21211
_uuid 06634d89-c838-4a06-ad76-6fca7deef5c0