reference : Dust and biological aerosols from the Sahara and Asia influence precipitation in the western U.S

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/reference/28f00b0f-822a-493d-a969-871c06edcf79
Bibliographic fields
reftype Journal Article
Abstract Winter storms in California’s Sierra Nevada increase seasonal snowpack and provide critical water resources and hydropower for the state. Thus, the mechanisms influencing precipitation in this region have been the subject of research for decades. Previous studies suggest Asian dust enhances cloud ice and precipitation, whereas few studies consider biological aerosols as an important global source of ice nuclei (IN). Here, we show that dust and biological aerosols transported from as far as the Sahara were present in glaciated high-altitude clouds coincident with elevated IN concentrations and ice-induced precipitation. This study presents the first direct cloud and precipitation measurements showing that Saharan and Asian dust and biological aerosols probably serve as IN and play an important role in orographic precipitation processes over the western United States.
Author Creamean, Jessie M. Suski, Kaitlyn J. Rosenfeld, Daniel Cazorla, Alberto DeMott, Paul J. Sullivan, Ryan C. White, Allen B. Ralph, F. Martin Minnis, Patrick Comstock, Jennifer M. Tomlinson, Jason M. Prather, Kimberly A.
DOI 10.1126/science.1227279
Date March 29, 2013
Issue 6127
Journal Science
Pages 1572-1578
Title Dust and biological aerosols from the Sahara and Asia influence precipitation in the western U.S
Volume 339
Year 2013
Bibliographic identifiers
.reference_type 0
_chapter ["Ch. 3: Water Resources FINAL"]
_record_number 4103
_uuid 28f00b0f-822a-493d-a969-871c06edcf79