reference : Atlantic hurricane trends linked to climate change

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/reference/3f236ffc-bac8-4ab7-8207-66d3c64e2dc6
Bibliographic fields
reftype Journal Article
Abstract Increases in key measures of Atlantic hurricane activity over recent decades are believed to reflect, in large part, contemporaneous increases in tropical Atlantic warmth [e.g., Emanuel, 2005]. Some recent studies [e.g., Goldenberg et al., 2001] have attributed these increases to a natural climate cycle termed the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), while other studies suggest that climate change may instead be playing the dominant role [Emanuel, 2005; Webster et al., 2005]. ; ; Using a formal statistical analysis to separate the estimated influences of anthropogenic climate change from possible natural cyclical influences, this article presents results indicating that anthropogenic factors are likely responsible for long-term trends in tropical Atlantic warmth and tropical cyclone activity. In addition, this analysis indicates that late twentieth century tropospheric aerosol cooling has offset a substantial fraction of anthropogenic warming in the region and has thus likely suppressed even greater potential increases in tropical cyclone activity.;
Author Mann, M.E. K.A. Emanuel
DOI 10.1029/2006EO240001
ISSN 0096-3941
Issue 24
Journal Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical Union
Pages 233-244
Title Atlantic hurricane trends linked to climate change
URL http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2006EO240001/pdf
Volume 87
Year 2006
Bibliographic identifiers
.reference_type 0
_chapter ["Ch. 2: Our Changing Climate FINAL"]
_record_number 1866
_uuid 3f236ffc-bac8-4ab7-8207-66d3c64e2dc6