reference : "A lot of it comes from the heart": The nature and integration of ecological knowledge in tribal and nontribal forest management

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/reference/44b1444b-29ab-4edd-b285-f8820660fc32
Bibliographic fields
reftype Journal Article
Abstract This article explores the generation, transmission, and nature of ecological knowledge used by tribal and nontribal natural resource management agency personnel who collectively manage a 666,542-acre forest in northern Minnesota. Using key informant interviews and an adapted grounded theory analysis, we documented the forms of knowledge participants expressed in their descriptions of the forest and forest management, including traditional and western scientific ecological knowledge. We found that study participants across agencies use multiple forms of knowledge, that this knowledge is generated and transferred in distinct ways, and that participants acknowledge several challenges and opportunities to integration of traditional and western scientific knowledge in forest management. Overall, ecological knowledge expressed by study participants revealed multiple ways of knowing the forest. Knowledge varied most distinctly in the influence of cultural identity and spiritual or metaphysical connections to the forest on knowledge generation, transmission, and content. Formalizing existing informal knowledge integration efforts with attention to power structures, institutional culture, and knowledge application is recommended.<br></br> <b>Management and Policy Implications:</b> Forest values, beliefs, and knowledge can vary dramatically and sometimes clash among natural resource professionals involved in comanaged forests, particularly those managed by tribal and nontribal agencies. Findings from in-depth interviews with tribal and nontribal resource managers reveal both distinct and shared perspectives on a comanaged forest in northern Minnesota; most notable were the unique roles of cultural identity and spiritual or metaphysical connections in knowledge generation, transmission, and content. Resource managers interested in the integration of traditional and western scientific ecological knowledge may find success in formalizing ongoing informal activities including mutual learning or training in cross-cultural contexts, relationship building among agency and tribal leaders, cooperation in forest and cultural resource management projects, and collaborative forest planning. Still, attention to existing power structures, institutional cultural differences, and knowledge application practices will be important to these efforts.
Author Bussey, John; Davenport, Mae A.; Emery, Marla R.; Carroll, Clint
DOI 10.5849/jof.14-130
Date //
Issue 2
Journal Journal of Forestry
Keywords adaptation; comanagement; forest management; traditional ecological knowledge; western scientific ecological knowledge
Pages 97-107
Title "A lot of it comes from the heart": The nature and integration of ecological knowledge in tribal and nontribal forest management
Volume 114
Year 2016
Bibliographic identifiers
_record_number 21239
_uuid 44b1444b-29ab-4edd-b285-f8820660fc32