reference : Effect modification by community characteristics on the short-term effects of ozone exposure and mortality in 98 US communities

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/reference/783e2c66-47c0-4770-aeb6-3ea4d0d6df59
Bibliographic fields
reftype Journal Article
Abstract Previous research provided evidence of an association between short-term exposure to ozone and mortality risk and of heterogeneity in the risk across communities. The authors investigated whether this heterogeneity can be explained by community-specific characteristics: race, income, education, urbanization, transportation use, particulate matter and ozone levels, number of ozone monitors, weather, and use of air conditioning. Their study included data on 98 US urban communities for 1987 to 2000 from the National Morbidity, Mortality, and Air Pollution Study; US Census; and American Housing Survey. On average across the communities, a 10-ppb increase in the previous week's ozone level was associated with a 0.52% (95% posterior interval: 0.28, 0.77) increase in mortality. The authors found that community-level characteristics modify the relation between ozone and mortality. Higher effect estimates were associated with higher unemployment, fraction of the Black/African-American population, and public transportation use and with lower temperatures or prevalence of central air conditioning. These differences may relate to underlying health status, differences in exposure, or other factors. Results show that some segments of the population may face higher health burdens of ozone pollution.
Author Bell, Michelle L.; Dominici, Francesca
DOI 10.1093/aje/kwm396
ISSN 0002-9262
Issue 8
Journal American Journal of Epidemiology
Notes 10.1093/aje/kwm396
Pages 986-997
Title Effect modification by community characteristics on the short-term effects of ozone exposure and mortality in 98 US communities
Volume 167
Year 2008
Bibliographic identifiers
_record_number 24273
_uuid 783e2c66-47c0-4770-aeb6-3ea4d0d6df59