reference : Defining the risk of zika and chikungunya virus transmission in human population centers of the eastern United States

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/reference/87664884-f938-4d71-82a3-e918a98673e2
Bibliographic fields
reftype Journal Article
Abstract Zika and chikungunya viruses are transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, including Ae. albopictus, which is abundant in many temperate cities. While disease risk is lower in temperate regions where viral amplification cannot build across years, there is significant potential for localized disease outbreaks in urban populations. We use a model informed by field data to assess the conditions likely to facilitate local transmission of virus from an infected traveler to Ae. albopictus and then to other humans in USA cities with variable human densities and seasonality. The model demonstrates that up to 50% of infectious travelers returning to the U.S. could initiate local transmission in temperate cities if are infectious and are exposed to high mosquito densities. This work highlights the need for high-resolution spatial data on Ae. albopictus density, biting behavior, and seasonality to better understand, predict and manage arboviral transmission risk in temperate cities.
Author Manore, Carrie A.; Ostfeld, Richard S.; Agusto, Folashade B.; Gaff, Holly; LaDeau, Shannon L.
DOI 10.1371/journal.pntd.0005255
Issue 1
Journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Pages e0005255
Publisher Public Library of Science
Title Defining the risk of zika and chikungunya virus transmission in human population centers of the eastern United States
Volume 11
Year 2017
Bibliographic identifiers
_record_number 25619
_uuid 87664884-f938-4d71-82a3-e918a98673e2