reference : Monitoring subsidence associated with groundwater dynamics in the Central Valley of California using interferometric radar

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/reference/8d05f053-d182-4a7d-b3d9-82d3ff77d03a
Bibliographic fields
reftype Book Section
Abstract California's Central Valley produces one quarter of the nation's food, much of it irrigated with groundwater. This chapter presents results of a continuing study of the application of Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to monitoring of land subsidence as a function of groundwater dynamics. It defines the full extent as well as the evolution from 2007 to 2011 of a large subsidence bowl in the southern San Joaquin Valley and presents the results in several different formats geared to different audiences. Further development, including subsurface geologic information, may allow more quantitative estimates of groundwater change based on InSAR subsidence histories. The aquifer system of the southern Central Valley has both unconfined and confined parts caused by alternating layers of coarse and fine‐grained sediments. Snow and surface water are of primary importance in the hydrologic cycle of California, and new techniques are today being applied to their mapping and monitoring.
Author Farr, Tom G.; Zhen Liu
Book Title Remote Sensing of the Terrestrial Water Cycle
DOI 10.1002/9781118872086.ch24
Editor Venkat Lakshmi; Douglas Alsdorf; Martha Anderson; Sylvain Biancamaria; Michael Cosh; Jared Entin; George Huffman; William Kustas; van Oevelen, Peter; Thomas Painter; Juraj Parajka; Matthew Rodell; Christoph Rüdiger
Pages 397-406
Place Published Washington, DC
Publisher American Geophysical Union
Series Volume Geophysical Monograph Series 206
Title Monitoring subsidence associated with groundwater dynamics in the Central Valley of California using interferometric radar
Year 2014
Bibliographic identifiers
.reference_type 7
_record_number 25295
_uuid 8d05f053-d182-4a7d-b3d9-82d3ff77d03a