reference : Driving blind: Weather-related vision hazards and fatal motor vehicle crashes

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/reference/bc6db90e-3e83-4c12-8270-83da70318f67
Bibliographic fields
reftype Journal Article
Abstract Abstract: Visibility-related weather hazards have significant impacts on motor vehicle operators due to decreased driver vision, reduced roadway speed, amplified speed variability, and elevated crash risk. This research presents a national analysis of fog-, smoke-, and dust storm-associated vehicular fatalities in the U.S. Initially, a database of weather-related motor vehicle crash fatalities from 1994?2011 is constructed from National Highway Traffic Safety Administration data. Thereafter, spatiotemporal analyses of visibility-related (crashes where a vision hazard was reported at time of event) and vision-obscured (driver's vision was recorded as obscured by weather and a weather-related vision hazard was reported) fatal vehicular crashes are presented. Results reveal that the annual number of fatalities associated with weather-related vision obscured vehicular crashes is comparable to those of more notable and captivating hazards such as tornadoes, floods, tropical cyclones, and lightning. The majority of these vision-obscured crash fatalities occurred in fog, on State and U.S. Numbered Highways, during the cool season, and during the morning commuting hours of 5 to 8 AM local time. Areas that experience the greatest frequencies of vision-obscured fatal crashes are located in the Central Valley of California, Appalachian Mountain and Mid-Atlantic region, the Midwest, and along the Gulf Coast. From 2007?2011, 72% of all vision-obscured fatal crashes occurred when there was no National Weather Service weather-related visibility advisory in effect. The deadliest weather-related visibility hazard crashes during the period are exhibited, revealing a spectrum of environmental and geographical settings that can trigger these high-end events. Capsule: The death toll from motor vehicle crashes due to weather-related vision hazards exceeds the number of fatalities caused by more notable hazards such as tornadoes, floods, tropical cyclones, and lightning.
Author Ashley, Walker S.; Strader, Stephen; Dziubla, Douglas C.; Haberlie, Alex
DOI 10.1175/BAMS-D-14-00026.1
ISSN 1520-0477
Issue 5
Journal Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society
Pages 755-778
Title Driving blind: Weather-related vision hazards and fatal motor vehicle crashes
Volume 96
Year 2015
Bibliographic identifiers
.publisher American Meteorological Society
.reference_type 0
_record_number 18995
_uuid bc6db90e-3e83-4c12-8270-83da70318f67