reference : Spatial and temporal variability of sea level rise hot spots over the eastern United States

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/reference/c02e02f3-5a54-40ab-9f09-76e98edcbd48
Bibliographic fields
reftype Journal Article
Abstract Regional sea level rise (SLR) acceleration during the past few decades north of Cape Hatteras has commonly been attributed to weakening Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, although this causal link remains debated. In contrast to this pattern, we demonstrate that SLR decelerated north of Cape Hatteras and accelerated south of the Cape to >20 mm/yr, > 3 times the global mean values from 2011 to 2015. Tide gauge records reveal comparable short-lived, rapid SLR accelerations (hot spots) that have occurred repeatedly over ~1500 km stretches of the coastline during the past 95 years, with variable latitudinal position. Our analysis indicates that the cumulative (time-integrated) effects of the North Atlantic Oscillation determine the latitudinal position of these SLR hot spots, while a cumulative El Niño index is associated with their timing. The superposition of these two ocean-atmospheric processes accounts for 87% of the variance in the spatiotemporal pattern of intradecadal sea level oscillations.
Author Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo; Dutton, Andrea; Martin, Jonathan B.
DOI 10.1002/2017GL073926
Issue 15
Journal Geophysical Research Letters
Pages 7876-7882
Title Spatial and temporal variability of sea level rise hot spots over the eastern United States
Volume 44
Year 2017
Bibliographic identifiers
_record_number 26242
_uuid c02e02f3-5a54-40ab-9f09-76e98edcbd48