reference : Sulfate aerosol and climatic change

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reftype Magazine Article
Abstract The predicted Earth warming based on recent increases in concentrations of greenhouse gases is slightly more than the observed warming of the atmosphere. In addition, the warming trend in North America does not appear to follow the global pattern. What might account for these and other deviations of fact from theory The answer is ironic. In all probability, aerosols primarily composed of sulfates, themselves the result of commercial activity, enhance the ability of the atmosphere to reflect sunlight back into space before it can reach the planet's surface and participate in the warming process. The sulfate particles, about 0.1 to one micron in diameter, are particularly concentrated over the industrial area of the Northern Hemisphere. Their capacity to cool by scattering sunlight has become a recognized force in climatic change only recently. Clearly, both the cooling effects of aerosols and the warming caused by greenhouse gases must be taken into account if we are to attain accurate climate models and effective industrial policies. 4 refs., 6 figs.
Accession Number OSTI ID: 5036577
Author Charlson, R.J. Wigley, T.M.L.
ISSN 0036-8733
Issue Number 2
Keywords 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES GREENHOUSE EFFECT EVALUATION SOLAR RADIATION REFLECTION SCATTERING AEROSOLS AIR POLLUTION SULFATES CLIMATIC CHANGE COLLOIDS DISPERSIONS OXYGEN COMPOUNDS POLLUTION RADIATIONS SOLS STELLAR RADIATION SULFUR COMPOUNDS
Magazine Scientific American
Pages 48-57
Title Sulfate aerosol and climatic change
Volume 270
Year 1994
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.reference_type 8
_chapter ["Ch. 27: Mitigation FINAL"]
_record_number 4081
_uuid c1ac9f69-81ef-48bc-9bd7-9d9c0b1f0a0e