reference : Climate change risks to US infrastructure: Impacts on roads, bridges, coastal development, and urban drainage

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/report/nca4/chapter/southeast/finding/key-message-19-1/reference/00e98394-26f1-45da-a5a3-e79b2b1a356f
Bibliographic fields
reftype Journal Article
Abstract Changes in temperature, precipitation, sea level, and coastal storms will likely increase the vulnerability of infrastructure across the United States. Using four models that analyze vulnerability, impacts, and adaptation, this paper estimates impacts to roads, bridges, coastal properties, and urban drainage infrastructure and investigates sensitivity to varying greenhouse gas emission scenarios, climate sensitivities, and global climate models. The results suggest that the impacts of climate change in this sector could be large, especially in the second half of the 21st century as sea-level rises, temperature increases, and precipitation patterns become more extreme and affect the sustainability of long-lived infrastructure. Further, when considering sea-level rise, scenarios which incorporate dynamic ice sheet melting yield impact model results in coastal areas that are roughly 70 to 80 % higher than results that do not incorporate dynamic ice sheet melting. The potential for substantial economic impacts across all infrastructure sectors modeled, however, can be reduced by cost-effective adaptation measures. Mitigation policies also show potential to reduce impacts in the infrastructure sector - a more aggressive mitigation policy reduces impacts by 25 to 35 %, and a somewhat less aggressive policy reduces impacts by 19 to 30 %. The existing suite of models suitable for estimating these damages nonetheless covers only a small portion of expected infrastructure sector effects from climate change, so much work remains to better understand impacts on electric and telecommunications networks, rail, and air transportation systems. In addition, the effects of climate-induced extreme events are likely to be important, but are incompletely understood and remain an emerging area for research.
Author Neumann, J. E.; Price, J.; Chinowsky, P.; Wright, L.; Ludwig, L.; Streeter, R.; Jones, R.; Smith, J. B.; Perkins, W.; Jantarasami, L.; Martinich, J.
DOI 10.1007/s10584-013-1037-4
Date Jul
ISSN 0165-0009
Issue 1
Journal Climatic Change
Keywords Infrastructure; Urban; Climate change; Transportation; Projection
Pages 97-109
Title Climate change risks to US infrastructure: Impacts on roads, bridges, coastal development, and urban drainage
Volume 131
Year 2015
Bibliographic identifiers
_record_number 22805
_uuid 00e98394-26f1-45da-a5a3-e79b2b1a356f