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@prefix dcterms: <http://purl.org/dc/terms/> .
@prefix xsd: <http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#> .
@prefix gcis: <http://data.globalchange.gov/gcis.owl#> .
@prefix cito: <http://purl.org/spar/cito/> .
@prefix biro: <http://purl.org/spar/biro/> .

<https://data.globalchange.gov/report/second-state-carbon-cycle-report-soccr2-sustained-assessment-report/chapter/coastal-ocean-and-continental-shelves/finding/key-message-16-2>
   dcterms:identifier "key-message-16-2";
   gcis:findingNumber "16.2"^^xsd:string;
   gcis:findingStatement "Available estimates of air-sea carbon fluxes, based on more than a decade of observations, indicate that the North American margins act as a net sink for atmospheric CO<sub>2</sub>. This net uptake is driven primarily by fluxes in the high-latitude regions. The estimated magnitude of the net flux is 160 ┬▒ 80 teragrams of carbon per year (<em>medium confidence</em>) for the North American Exclusive Economic Zone, a number that is not well constrained."^^xsd:string;
   gcis:isFindingOf <https://data.globalchange.gov/report/second-state-carbon-cycle-report-soccr2-sustained-assessment-report/chapter/coastal-ocean-and-continental-shelves>;
   gcis:isFindingOf <https://data.globalchange.gov/report/second-state-carbon-cycle-report-soccr2-sustained-assessment-report>;

## Properties of the finding:
   
   gcis:descriptionOfEvidenceBase "This statement is supported by the numbers summarized in Tables 16.1 and 16.2. Consistent reports of outgassing exist only for the Gulf of Maine (GOM), where the net flux is almost neutral, and the West Florida Shelf. Contradictory reports exist for the Scotian Shelf. Everywhere else the net flux is reported as net uptake (i.e., sink), although with large uncertainties. Three independent studies also provide estimates of net air-sea CO<sub>2</sub> exchange in North American coastal waters. Two are global data syntheses (Chen et al., 2013; Laruelle et al., 2014), and one is from a process-based global model (Bourgeois et al., 2016; see Table 16.2). The model of Bourgeois et al. (2016) estimates a net air-sea CO<sub>2</sub> flux of 160 teragrams of carbon (Tg C) per year for the North American Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). The estimate is that the uncertainty is 50%.<br><br>These individual estimates cannot be combined because of discrepancies in numbers and gaps in coverage."^^xsd:string;
   
   gcis:assessmentOfConfidenceBasedOnEvidence "The statement that North American coastal waters act as a sink overall can be made with high confidence and reflects the fact that studies are consistent in supporting this conclusion, even though each number itself comes with a large uncertainty. The overall uptake estimate is uncertain; hence, there is high confidence in stating that this flux estimate is poorly constrained."^^xsd:string;
   
   gcis:newInformationAndRemainingUncertainties "The consistency among studies pointing at North American coastal waters as a sink provides confidence, although each individual estimate is uncertain."^^xsd:string;

   a gcis:Finding .

## This finding cites the following entities:



<https://data.globalchange.gov/report/second-state-carbon-cycle-report-soccr2-sustained-assessment-report/chapter/coastal-ocean-and-continental-shelves/finding/key-message-16-2>
   prov:wasDerivedFrom <https://data.globalchange.gov/report/second-state-carbon-cycle-report-soccr2-sustained-assessment-report/chapter/preface/figure/figurep-4>.