reference : The effects of environmental change on individuals and groups: Some neglected issues in stress research

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reftype Journal Article
Abstract Homeostatic models of the effects of environmental change often entail certain assumptions that may not be warranted. It is widely assumed that the effects of negative environmental change or stress are necessarily adverse and have relatively short-term effects. It is further assumed that these effects are linear, that is, the greater the stress, the more negative the outcome. In contrast, from an ecological and developmental perspective, environmental change is seen as having possible paradoxical (i.e., positive) outcomes as well, depending upon the type and timing of the outcome assessed, and situational and individual factors. Non-linear models are reviewed for their applicability to a broader conceptualization of environmental change. This approach includes both multiple determinants and outcomes of stress, and is sensitive to ecological and developmental concerns, such as the timing and context of the stressor and possible long-term outcomes.
Author Aldwin, Carolyn; Stokols, Daniel
DOI 10.1016/S0272-4944(88)80023-9
Date March
ISSN 0272-4944
Issue 1
Journal Journal of Environmental Psychology
Pages 57-75
Title The effects of environmental change on individuals and groups: Some neglected issues in stress research
Volume 8
Year 1988
Bibliographic identifiers
.reference_type 0
_record_number 18050
_uuid 1033040b-fcff-419e-ad20-8a3a7b0c5013